3 Steps to 30% REX Rewards on Telos

3 Steps to 30% REX Rewards on Telos

REX staking is about to come to Telos and the rewards are going to be much, much higher than on any other EOSIO chain, thanks to the recently passed Telos Economic Development Plan. With the TEDP, 1,000,000 TLOS per month will be funded as an additional reward for REX staking. This is likely to yield a staking reward in the range of 30% APR.

Here’s how to earn your T-REX staking rewards:

1. Access your Telos account from your favorite wallet.
All EOS genesis holders will already have one created for them using their genesis account name and keys. Simply add the Telos Mainnet to your wallet’s known networks to access it.

If you don’t have a Telos account, you can create one for free and add TLOS from Chainrift, Newdex, Akdex, CoinTiger, or any other exchange that lists TLOS.

2. Vote for 21+ Telos BPs or a proxy.
REX requires that an account is actively voting for at least 21 block producers. You can vote from Sqrl or other wallets, or from a block explorer. You can also proxy your votes to any Telos voting proxy.

3. Stake your TLOS to REX for high rewards.
Stake (lend) TLOS tokens from your account from any wallet or block explorer that has Telos REX enabled (most will by the start of REX staking or shortly after).

You can stake TLOS tokens that are liquid or already staked for resources. Tokens staked to REX will receive REX tokens instead of TLOS. There is an initial 4-day maturation period before REX can be redeemed for TLOS again. However, REX tokens will continue to accrue rewards until they are redeemed (un-lent).

REX tokens can only go up in price. You will be able to track your tokens from your favorite REX-enabled block explorer or wallet.

1 Million TLOS tokens per month will be distributed to Telos REX rewards by the TEDP. The expected reward is about 30% annual interest, while Telos has 0% inflation. Any account can take advantage of Telos REX.

Telos wallets:

Sqrl
Scatter
My Telos Wallet
Math Wallet
Awake Wallet
Lynx Wallet
CoolX Wallet
Kibisis Wallet

Exchanges listing TLOS:

Chainrift
Newdex
Akdex
CoinTiger
Abcc

About the author: Douglas Horn is the Telos architect and whitepaper author, and the founder of GoodBlock, a block producer and app developer for the Telos Blockchain Network.

More about GoodBlock can be found at: www.goodblock.io

Join us on Twitter @GoodBlockio

Vote for GoodBlock on the Telos Blockchain Network @goodblocktls

Telos Testnet Update Report

Telos Testnet Update Report

August 7, 2019

Testnet Table Corruption Post-mortem

The Telos Core Devs reported on July 26, 2019 about its work in performing a postmortem investigation of the corrupted ‘producers’ table on the Telos testnet that required a roll-back and restoration of the testnet. The ‘producers’ table keeps track of the block producers, their produced and missed blocks, payments, votes received, and other important information. The chain cannot function if this table is corrupted. Until the root cause of this problem was found, it would be potentially unsafe to upgrade to the next version of eosio on our mainnet for risk of creating the same problem there. The TCD has, therefore, investigated this issue with an abundance of caution. Fortunately, the root cause has now been discovered and updating the Telos mainnet can proceed.

The Cause

The corruption of the ‘producers’ table was caused by a different structure of the testnet version of this table compared to the mainnet version. In short, the testnet has been operating in its current form since long before the mainnet was launched in December 2018. In developing the feature to unreg non-functional block producers from the schedule, an additional table column was added to reflect the unreg reason. This existed in the mainnet version of the ‘producers’ table, but not in the testnet version, which had been developed previously. EOSIO tables cannot be updated in structure once created and filled with data. When the update to code for the mainnet was pushed to the testnet in order to test REX creation features, the functions written for the Telos mainnet — with one extra table column for unreg reason — conflicted with the structure of the testnet version which did not have this column. The result was that the table was corrupted by receiving data of a different type which was meant for a different column.

The Path Forward

One of the aspects that made finding this problem difficult is the fact that it does not exist on the Telos mainnet because the table structures match between the mainnet and the source code. While this proved vexing in debugging, the very good news is that it means that no action is necessary to address this issue on the Telos mainnet. This means that the process of upgrading Telos system contracts to be able to support the changes of the Telos Economic Development Plan (TEDP) including REX staking can proceed immediately and the upgrade to eosio 1.8.x can progress thereafter.

Restarting Telos Testnet

The function of a testnet is to replicate a mainnet as closely as possible so that code can be tested there and expected to perform identically on the mainnet. Due to this error in the ‘producers’ table, the current testnet does not fit this purpose and is unsuitable for testing — particularly for testing this function. Therefore, the TCD and Telos block producers are creating a new testnet to replace the current one. This will allow new functions to be tested before implementing them on our mainnet.

The current Telos testnet will be depreciated in the near future, following a period of time for developers working there to migrate their test applications to the new version. This is perfectly within the expected life-cycle of a testnet. Periodic replacement of the Telos testnet is expected and needed to prune unnecessarily large storage files that result from prolonged operation of the testnet. The Telos block producers will determine the official date for retiring the previous testnet. Until that period, there will be two testnets with the newer one being used by the TCD but the older one reflected on public block explorers.

Updating Telos Mainnet

The TCD has already produced the new source code necessary to update the Telos mainnet for TEDP and REX. Before new code is pushed to the mainnet, the TCD must merge and compile the proposed code and conduct unit tests to ensure it is performing as intended (and perform fixes where it does not). This unit testing phase is expected to conclude by Friday, August 9th. Once complete, this code will be pushed to the new testnet for operations testing. Upon successful deployment there, the updated code will be proposed as a multisig transaction for the Telos block producers. When approved by the BPs, these new functions will run on the Telos mainnet and the features of the TEDP and REX will be active.

About the author: Douglas Horn is the Telos architect and whitepaper author, and the founder of GoodBlock, a block producer and app developer for the Telos Blockchain Network.

More about GoodBlock can be found at: www.goodblock.io

Join us on Twitter @GoodBlockio

Vote for GoodBlock on the Telos Blockchain Network @goodblocktls

Telos Weekly Report — August 2nd, 2019

Telos Weekly Report — August 2nd, 2019

Thank You for Hacking our Election

I went into this week thinking that I would wake up Saturday morning to see that the TED Plan had successfully completed its historic blockchain election. But it turns out that there was an attempted election hack at the very end. Who says blockchain elections are just like national elections?

There are some details below, but suffice to say, there was a bug we were aware of but hadn’t patched yet. Surely, we thought, no one would try to exploit it to crash our election. But, of course, someone did. Welcome to blockchain. Why didn’t we see that coming?

Given that this was an issue we knew about, the hack was not our finest hour. It looked like the TEDP would technically fail to reach its needed threshold for passage even though it previously had been passing with about 97% Yes votes to 3% No votes (plus a lot of Abstain votes by some BPs and large TFRP accounts). Fortunately, what happened afterward is something we can truly be proud of.

A large group of the Telos block producers — also representing many members of the Telos Core Developers — discussed the matter for several hours. It was an excellent discussion of Telos source code, governance documents, development and review process, and more. In the end, the group was able to land on a solution that addressed the attempted election hack by bringing the source code for Telos ratify/amend functions much closer to what is described in the text of our governance documents. This working group unanimously agreed that solution was entirely appropriate within both the spirit and letter of our operating agreement. We proposed source code updates for the eosio.amend and eosio.saving (WPS, which would suffer from the same exploit) and pushed it to our Github repository. Within a few hours, the code I wrote was reviewed by several reviewers, merged and was soon being tested on our testnet. Along the way, we updated the community with notice of the problem and the proposed solution and received overwhelming support.

I’m enormously proud of how the Telos BPs, devs, and community came together to address this attempted exploit. Blockchain governance is a wonky subject that can be hard to grasp. No one cares about it until it’s broken or you face a crisis. This incident is a standout demonstration of why blockchain governance absolutely matters. Team Telos was able to snatch victory from the jaws of a last-second defeat because we have a truly functioning governance system that is responsive to the needs of the chain and community and at the same time gives us a variety of tools to maintain consensus — not just about the transactions written to the blockchain, but the social and community construct of how the chain itself will be operated. Whoever hacked our election did us a huge favor by giving us an opportunity to demonstrate how effective, responsive, and rapidly consensus-building Telos governance actually is in the face of crisis.

To me, this is the second meaning of “third-generation blockchain”: we have outgrown the concept that the only consensus that a blockchain requires is what values are written to the chain. That is first-generation blockchain consensus-building and governance. Second-generation is forking off sub-communities in times of crisis based on differing core beliefs, like any blockchain with “Cash,” “Classic,” or the like in its name. The third generation of blockchain governance is what Telos is demonstrating: creating a variety of tools for keeping a blockchain and community cohesive and together even in the face of attack. Instead of tearing Telos appart, this attack pulled us together and the chain goes.

Congrats on a big week, Telos!

— Douglas Horn

Here’s what happened this week:

  • Telos Mainnet Passes 40 Million Blocks
  • Telos Community Votes to Approve the Telos Economic Development Plan
  • Telos Podcast #4 and #5 Released
  • Update to Ratify/Amend and WPS Contracts

Telos Mainnet Passes 40 Million Blocks

Today, August 2nd, 2019 at 16:28:29 UTC, the Telos mainnet produced it’s 40 millionth block. Congratulations to EOSBarcelona, who was the block producer. This block was also momentous because the Telos block producer rewards move from 3% annual inflation or about 820 TLOS per day ($1,230 per month BP income at current prices) ratchets down to 2% annual inflation or about 547 TLOS per day ($820 per month BP income). With BP income not matching expenses, this is an important concern for the resiliency of the network. Voting on the Telos Economic Development Plan was meant to address this, but other events from this week delayed this. Fortunately, when the TEDP is implemented in a few days, block producer pay will move to the equivalent of 6% inflation, but without any inflation, since the funds will be taken from the unclaimed tokens of the Exchange Token Reserve Fund.

Telos Community Votes to Approve the Telos Economic Development Plan

The Telos community has spoken and voted this week to approve the Telos Economic Development Plan. This means that the Telos Foundation and Worker Proposal systems will get more money, REX is going live, and Telos is going to become a 0% inflation chain.

This was not without a cliffhanger at the end, of course. An account attempted to exploit a flaw in the code for counting the final election results. Fortunately, between the Telos BPs and core devs, we found a great solution that should keep the TED Plan moving forward. The code to address the exploit has been reviewed and tested on the Telos testnet. The multi-sig transactions necessary to push the code to our mainnet should be proposed by today. Once it is signed by 15 active block producers and executed, I (as the proposer of the ballot) will close the TEDP ballot and calculate the votes. Jesse Schulman from CalEOS has been leading the creation of code to execute the TEDP, and this will go into effect as soon as possible. It’s currently still in testing.

Where do the funds come from for the TEDP?
There is a large account with tokens that were reserved for exchanges at the EOS genesis snapshot. Ideally, these exchanges would claim their tokens for their users, but since they have yet to do so, we are gradually applying these funds to other network needs, as mentioned above. 1,000,000 additional TLOS will be put into circulation by the REX rewards pool each month. This translates into around 30% rewards (at 0% inflation) and it could last for a few years if we dial down other expenses as the TLOS price rises.

Telos Podcast #4 and #5 Released

Two episodes of the Worker Proposal funded Telos Podcast were released this week. Podcast #4 was with SEEDS facilitator Reiki Cordon. In this episode, Brandon and Reiki discuss why Telos governance is unique and the SEEDS governance approach, as well as their tokenomics, origins, and market strategy. SEEDS is sewing economically and ecologically decentralized societies, hoping to create minimal viable societies. They’re building financial, governance, and organizational tools to help people to spin up these minimal viable societies with a goal of helping to build regenerative cultures.

On episode 5, Brandon interviewed Infinitybloc’s Justin Giudici and had more of a Telos focus. Brandon and Justin examined multiple areas of Telos, including the Worker Proposal System, the TED Plan, the Telos Foundation, marketplaces and more. Justin is the CEO of Infinitybloc, and on the Telos Foundation Board as leader of the Telos dapp outreach group.

And stay tuned on Monday because Telos Podcast #6 should be coming out then, where I finally get my turn to talk to Brandon. We talk about the TED Plan, Telos economics, some really big developments on Telos like TIPFS and the new Trail 2.0 voting, how Telos governance got a big win by addressing the attempted election hack, and how all of these topics roll together into a really bright future for Telos.

Update to Ratify/Amend and WPS Contracts

On Saturday, July 27th, Telos block producers and core developers were prompted to take a closer look at the voting code for the Ratify/Amend and Worker Proposal Systems due to an exploit utilized by a Telos account. There was a potential exploit that we hadn’t patched soon enough. It was based on the fact that the original code was not really adhering closely to the Telos governance and fortunately, fixing that problem could also eliminate the hack. Fortunately, we noticed this before the ballot was closed, and the fix for both the WPS and the Ratify/Amend voting systems have been pushed to the Telos Foundation Github repository, and we’re running tests on this code, hoping to move it to testnet soon. Once it’s successfully tested, there will be a multisig transaction for block producers to bring the code to the Telos mainnet, and close the ballot, and execute the TEDP.

View GoodBlock’s press release at http://bit.ly/2YsXJzz
View Telos Miami’s press release at http://bit.ly/2KdMYgB

Worker Proposals of Note

Newest:

Telos Core Development: Sqrl Wallet (#22) (cycle 3 of 4)
Voting closes: Sat Aug 10th 15:27 UTC
125,000.0000 TLOS in 1 cycle to ‘marlon.tf’ for work performed to date on ongoing development and support of Sqrl wallet.
https://ipfs.telos.miami/ipfs/QmWkMvEa7f878QPkrRMkH4gr3rBcmp39QBFR3dCujJzhWh/
Yes: 5,878,110 | No: 120,014 | Abstain: 756,430

Ending Soon:

Catering for FREE 1-day EOSIO Blockchain Developer Workshop in London (#21)
Voting closes: Friday Aug 9th 10:31 UTC
20,000.0000 TLOS in 12 cycles to ‘dacblockstalk’ for sponsoring meals at an EOSIO developer workshop in London for blockchain developers, software engineers and computer scientists. https://ipfs.telos.miami/ipfs/QmRAnasG2tzt4JfAkBuFCwR8N1Q32CKgeykYWFzGNwrnV7
Yes: 5,497,111 | No: 447,690 | Abstain: 772,671

Telos Promotional Animated Videos (#19) (Cycle 1 of 3)
Voting closes: Tuesday August 6th 19:23 UTC
30,000.0000 TLOS in 1 cycle to ‘marketing101’ to fund a series of one minute promotional videos about the Telos Blockchain.
https://ipfs.telos.miami/ipfs/Qmb2XM1G2Syz1nsonWds2Pq2KuRRxB2ub5yZ6huMUzEJBu/
Yes: 5,780,001 | No: 1,967,994 | Abstain: 426,777

Telos YouTube and Website Promotion (#18)
Voting closes: Tuesday August 8th 19:33 UTC
20,000.0000 TLOS in 12 cycles to ‘promotetelos’ to promote Telos on the HodlEOS Youtube channel, Eosio.support, and Eosnewswire.one.
https://ipfs.telos.miami/ipfs/QmbV8vsW37wdTUTNroiWMmHUMygWRjrhxznQSRzNvjLQeC/
Yes: 5,639,554 | No: 684,982 | Abstain: 0

Ended and Passed!

Telos Marketing Proposal (#13) (cycle 3 of 4)
Voting closes: Wed July 31st 14:34 UTC
85,000.0000 TLOS in 4 cycles to ‘marketing1o1’ for marketing to increase Telos awareness among developers, crypto and non-crypto users, and apps already on EOS.
https://ipfs.telos.miami/ipfs/QmdhqCNPyuB7wvnEiPCBmbnuM9XVg3mGrsiQFECE1emWT4/

Don’t forget to re-cast your vote for WPs that last multiple cycles. This feature helps to keep longer-term WPs accountable for deliverables, and let voters decide whether they think the WP is still of value to the network.

This week’s active multi-cycle WPs include:
Aggressive Telos Enterprise Solutions contacting for Cities and Towns in the United States! (#23) (Cycle 1 of 12)
Telos Promotional Animated Videos (#19) (Cycle 1 of 3)
Telos YouTube and Website Promotion (#18) (Cycle 2 of 12)
The Telos Podcast — Professional YouTube Show & Podcast (#16) (Cycle 2 of 6)
Telos Marketing Proposal (#13) (Cycle 3 of 4)
Telos Promotion and Outreach (#10) (Cycle 4 of 12)
SteemChurch Telos Expansion(#4) (Cycle 5 of 6)

If you haven’t downloaded the newest version of Sqrl (1.0.12), you can find it here.

We believe the worker proposal system is a big part of what makes Telos great, and highly encourage you to make your voice heard by voting responsibly on the governance of this blockchain.

About the author: Douglas Horn is the Telos architect and whitepaper author, and the founder of GoodBlock, a block producer and app developer for the Telos Blockchain Network.

More about GoodBlock can be found at: www.goodblock.io

Join us on Twitter @GoodBlockio

Vote for GoodBlock on the Telos Blockchain Network @goodblocktls

Update to Telos Amend and Worker Proposal System Voting Contracts

Update to Telos Amend and Worker Proposal System Voting Contracts

Douglas Horn

On Saturday, July 27, when the first Telos ratification ballot had been completed, an exploit utilized by one Telos account prompted a closer look at how the voting code for the Telos Amend voting (eosio.amend) and the Worker Proposal System voting (eosio.saving) are calculated. Errors were found in both the configuration settings of eosio.amend and in the figures used to calculate the voting thresholds required to pass a ballot or to refund the deposit from one. The nature of both the incorrect configuration settings and code errors were that they did not adhere as closely as possible to the governance stated in the TBNOA (Telos Blockchain Network Operating Agreement).

What the Governance Documents Say

Paragraph 38 of the TBNOA addresses governance amendments. It reads:

“The Telos Governance Documents may be amended by a vote of the TLOS token holders using the “ratifyamend” contract. To ratify or amend any Telos Governance Document, any user may execute the “ratifyamend” contract, paying its contract fee of 700 TLOS (the “Ratify/Amend Contract Fee”), which may be returned if the contract receives a minimum of 1% of votes from all TLOS voters. This fee may be paid by one Member or collected from many Members over time to execute when the full cost has been collected. Once the fee has been fully paid, the full text of the proposed new document, or the existing document in the case of ratification, shall be recorded to the Telos blockchain. No Telos Governance Documents shall be ratified or amended except by a vote of the TLOS token holders, as recorded by the “ratifyamend” contract with no less than 15% vote participation among votable TLOS tokens and no fewer than 10% more Yes than No votes, at the end of a 5,000,000 block voting period (approximately 29 days).”

The TBNOA was ratified prior to completion of code development for these additional voting features. As a result, there is an inconsequential mismatch between the name of contract listed (ratifyamend) and the actual contract name (eosio.amend).

The important settings named in this paragraph are meant to be held in the eosio.amend ‘configs’ table. The threshold of tokens voted among all votable tokens that is required to pass a proposal is ‘threshold_pass_voters’ which should be set to 15.00, meaning 15%. The amount of tokens voted as Yes compared to the total number of tokens voted Yes or No (but not Abstain) that is required to pass a proposal is ‘threshold_pass_votes’ which should be set to 55.00, meaning 55% or 10% more Yes votes than No votes.

Similarly, the threshold of tokens voted among all voteable tokens that is required to have the deposit fee refunded for a proposal is ‘threshold_fee_voters’ which should be set to 1.00, meaning 1%. The amount of tokens voted as Yes compared to the total number of tokens voted Yes or No (but not Abstain) that is required to have the deposit fee refunded for a proposal is ‘threshold_fee_votes’ which should be set to 0.00, meaning that there is no requirement to have more Yes votes than No votes.

Figure 1. The eosio.amend ‘configs’ table holds the values for Telos Amend ballots.

The Configuration Errors

The figures for ‘threshold_pass_voters’, ‘threshold_pass_votes’, ‘threshold_fee_voters’, and ‘threshold_fee_votes’ were set incorrectly to 5.00, 66.67, 4.00, and 25.00 respectively instead of to 15.00, 55.00, 1.00, and 0.00. The most consequential impact of these errors would be that a measure could pass with just 5% of the amount of voteable TLOS tokens instead of the required 15%. Additionally, the requirement to pass would be 66.67% Yes votes instead of 55.00% Yes votes. While the TEDP would have passed both of these requirements, it is still important to have the configuration settings match the levels mentioned in the governance documents. Fortunately, the calculation is not performed until the TED Plan ballot is closed (when the original proposer calls the ‘closeprop’ action) and these configuration errors can be resolved before that occurs.

The Code Errors

“Voteable TLOS tokens” as referenced in the TBNOA refers to the tokens in Telos accounts that have registered to vote using the eosio.trail ‘regvoter’ action. These tokens are recorded on the chain as VOTE tokens in the eosio.trail ‘registries’ table. The total number of “voteable TLOS tokens” is the same as the ‘supply’ entry on the table for VOTE tokens. Currently, this is 26,149,527.9088. The ‘total_voters’ entry on this table records the number of unique accounts that are registered to vote. That number is 5,398.

The code for eosio.amend’s ‘closeprop’ action contains an error in how it counts the number of voters. The existing version counts the number of unique accounts voting as a percentage of the ‘total_voters’ figure, using the number of accounts that have registered to vote no matter how many TLOS tokens they may hold. However, this is not in line with what the TBNOA calls for. This was a known error that was intended to be corrected by this time. An update to the Trail voting system has been planned for some time but has not been implemented yet due to tight programmer resources.

The Exploit

Using the total number of accounts holding voteable TLOS tokens as the determination for whether the participation threshold had been met allowed an exploit where one account could create a large number of accounts and register them to vote even though they held few TLOS. Done in sufficiently large numbers, this would mean that all future Telos Amend proposals could be made to fail based on the account number threshold and therefore no governance correction could be made because a nearly limitless amount of accounts could be easily created. This would create an intractable situation that was certainly never intended by the authors or adopters of the TBNOA.

In the last hours before the TEDP ballot was about to expire with about 97% Yes votes (compared to No votes) and over 17 million total votes cast, the Telos account, ‘arfasys11111’ created hundreds of new Telos accounts with sequential names and identical keys. These accounts were all registered to vote, thus increasing the amount of ‘total_voters’ that would be used to assess whether the TEDP ballot would pass the threshold under the previous version of the code. Due to the speed of the account creation and registry, it was almost certainly performed by a bot or script for just this purpose.

The Outcome

It is fortunate that this exploit came to light before the ballot was closed or the TEDP would have failed despite the obvious intent of the voters. The Telos block producers and core developers consulted the program code, governance documents, and voting results and have determined that the only reasonable course of action is to correct the code errors (the same error exists twice, once to calculate passage of the ballot and once to determine if the depositor’s fee will be returned) and the configuration settings prior to executing the eosio.amend ‘closeprop’ action.

This voting error also exists on the WPS voting system (eosio.saving) and will be similarly corrected. The code changes for these (about 4 lines of code each) have already been pushed to the Telos Foundation Github repository, where they have been reviewed and merged. We are currently running unit tests on this code and hope to move it to the testnet soon. After it is successfully tested on the testnet, we will create a multisig transaction for the block producers to bring this code to the Telos mainnet. Once this is done, we can close the ballot and execute the TEDP.

About the author: Douglas Horn is the Telos architect and whitepaper author, and the founder of GoodBlock, a block producer and app developer for the Telos Blockchain Network.

More about GoodBlock can be found at: www.goodblock.io

Join us on Twitter @GoodBlockio

Vote for GoodBlock on the Telos Blockchain Network @goodblocktls

Telos Weekly Report — July 26th, 2019

Telos Weekly Report — July 26th, 2019

Picking up Steam

After a couple of slower news weeks for Telos, we are suddenly swimming in good news. We announced our big partner project to Drakos Keep — called dRealms — this week. That has been a project I’ve been excited to tell people about. We have some more information about it coming soon that will help people understand just how revolutionary dRealms will actually be.

We have a new multi-platform mobile wallet that’s “Telos First” from EOSZA, and in the TCD update, you can read that Telos Miami is planning a Sqrl mobile app with the same great Telos governance features of its desktop wallet. And now you can use your Trezor to store your TLOS!

There’s so much news this week, I won’t dwell on much here. But there’s one story that is really center for me, which is the completion of our first Ratify/Amend governance vote on Telos. This is a historic vote. If you haven’t voted yet, you have a few hours still to get in on the fun. Currently, the proposal is over the needed threshold and leaning towards a Yes vote by 97% with about 17.6 million TLOS voted. The TCD and BPs are already working on a plan to start implementing the TED Plan. In fact, there’s already code running on our testnet. We won’t be able to implement everything immediately. (Read the Telos Core Devs update linked below for details.) Our goal is to do as much as possible as quickly as possible without ever endangering the Telos mainnet. I realize that we are all looking forward to those T-REX staking rewards and the additional TLOS holders we expect it to bring.

Have a great weekend and…Go Telos!

— Douglas Horn

Ratify/Amend Voting

Telos Economic Development Plan (#0) — Ending Soon!
Voting closes: Sat Jul 27 2019 10:38:43 UTC
Here are the proposed clauses to replace the corresponding clauses in the existing TBNOA:
Clause 10. Block Producer Pay
Clause 23. Requirement to Opt-in as a Member
Clause 24. Worker Proposal Fund
Clause 44. Resource Exchange
Clause 49. Telos Economic Development
Yes: 10,922,383 | No: 354,575 | Abstain: 6,078,043

Worker Proposals of Note

Newest:

Aggressive Telos Enterprise Solutions contacting for Cities and Towns in the United States! (#23) (cycle 1 of 12)
Voting closes: Mon Aug 19th 21:04 UTC
150,000.0000 TLOS in 12 cycles to ‘telosgvments’ for cold contacting cities and towns to steer them to the Telos Blockchain Solutions group for potential onboarding.
https://ipfs.telos.miami/ipfs/QmQepH9dqdpcNAoJdetTcH5SvU89TwrHKRdnDySpcgeM4F/
Yes: 11,501 | No: 2,139,680 | Abstain: 12,710[1]

Telos Core Devs WP #3 — Fund 2 months of finished work by TCD (#24)
Voting closes: Thurs Aug 22nd 23:43 UTC
303,500.0000 TLOS in 1 cycle to ‘teloscoredev’ for work performed to date on Telos Arbitration portal development and testnet recovery.
https://ipfs.telosfoundation.io/QmTVWy3dywQb5Xa3pCPHAPW9cxztrrAwkLkSRnVbDRbEec
Yes: 1,217,005 | No: 0 | Abstain: 0

Ending Soon:

Telos Marketing Proposal (#13) (cycle 3 of 4)
Voting closes: Wed July 31st 14:34 UTC
85,000.0000 TLOS in 4 cycles to ‘marketing1o1’ for marketing to increase Telos awareness among developers, crypto and non-crypto users, and apps already on EOS.
https://ipfs.telos.miami/ipfs/QmdhqCNPyuB7wvnEiPCBmbnuM9XVg3mGrsiQFECE1emWT4/
Yes: 4,139,080 | No: 285,559 | Abstain: 23,250

All voting numbers current as of July 25, 2019.

Ended and Passed!

The Telos Podcast — Professional YouTube Show & Podcast (#16) (cycle 2 of 6)
Voting closed: Thu Jul 25th 21:38 UTC
25,000.0000 TLOS in 6 cycles to ‘gyztiobugege’ to fund a professional Telos-focused podcast and YouTube show.
https://ipfs.telos.miami/ipfs/QmcGi3mbzuSRMUM5ZF8sVdzZ3yJt7YdCE18mDbBowTiFQw/

SteemChurch Telos Expansion: resubmission (#4) (cycle 5 of 6)
Voting closed: Thu July 26th 10:32 UTC
15,000.0000 (6 cycles) to accounts.jc over 6 months funding for a Telos referral program, onboarding process, blockchain participation and ongoing community development in developing nations.
https://ipfs.telos.miami/ipfs/QmagTmLTob1kTUz47odnsLXtva96fmnpQyzPKjBdcpy9wC/

Don’t forget to re-cast your vote for WPs that last multiple cycles. This feature helps to keep longer-term WPs accountable for deliverables, and let voters decide whether they think the WP is still of value to the network.

This week’s active multi-cycle WPs include:
Aggressive Telos Enterprise Solutions contacting for Cities and Towns in the United States! (#23) (Cycle 1 of 12)
Telos Promotional Animated Videos (#19) (Cycle 1 of 3)
Telos YouTube and Website Promotion (Cycle 2 of 12)
The Telos Podcast — Professional YouTube Show & Podcast (Cycle 2 of 6)
Telos Marketing Proposal (Cycle 3 of 4)
Telos Promotion and Outreach (Cycle 4 of 12)
SteemChurch Telos Expansion (Cycle 5 of 6)

If you haven’t downloaded the newest version of Sqrl (1.0.12), you can find it here.

We believe the worker proposal system is a big part of what makes Telos great, and highly encourage you to make your voice heard by voting responsibly on the governance of this blockchain.

Here’s what happened this week:

  • GoodBlock Announces dRealms Gaming Universe and new Drakos Keep site
  • Chainrift adds USDT pair for TLOS
  • CoolX Wallet Available on the Apple Store Offers Free Telos Accounts
  • Boid Season 2 Begins, Telos Returning Reigning Champions from Season 1
  • Telos has its first NFT Marketplace in Beta to Accompany Kolobok Game
  • Trezor Now Available on telos.bloks.io
  • TLOS now listed on Marketcap.one
  • Blocktivity repairs Telos activity meter
  • Telos Core Devs update and roadmap

GoodBlock Announces dRealms Gaming Universe and new Drakos Keep site
The announcement we’re the most thrilled to share this week is the release of the dRealms whitepaper and website (dRealms.io). dRealms is a set of tools that will empower creators to make true ownership digital game assets that work across games and blockchains (we talked about this a little in our Revolution in Blockchain Games video). We also have been busy working on Drakos Keep, we’ve got a gameplay video to share, as well as a new website.

Chainrift adds USDT pair for TLOS
Chainrift, a popular exchange for TLOS users, has added a USDT pair for TLOS this week. Chainrift is committed to improve the cryptocurrency ecosystem by only supporting projects that have proven legitimacy. Telos is proud to be part of that ecosystem, and we’re excited that there’s a new USDT on-ramp for TLOS. https://twitter.com/ChainRift/status/1153339461729759233

CoolX Wallet Available on the Apple Store Offers Free Telos Accounts
A new wallet has made it onto the Apple store and the Google Play store called CoolX. CoolX is a simple wallet that offers free account creation for TLOS accounts. The wallet is created by Telos BP candidate EOS South Africa (EOSZA) whose goal is to support eosio developers and projects. This new wallet is designed with a “Telos First” perspective and EOSZA welcomes suggestions on their Telegram channel at t.me/coolX_wallet.

Apple Store download: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/coolx-wallet/id1472490170?ls=1

Google Play Store download: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=za.wallet.coolx

Boid Season 2 Begins, Telos Returning Champions from Season 1
Telos won the first round of Boid, and now we’re back for Season 2! Boid is a distributed computing application, a “Social Supercomputer” that uses your computer’s power to work on large complicated tasks such as mapping cancer markers, and paying you for the work your computer does.

“We won the last round, we can win again!”

GoodBlock has pledged an additional 2,000 TLOS as a reward for the Telos Boid Team for season 2. Join our team at https://app.boid.com/t/Telos!

Read Boid’s Season 2 announcement at https://medium.com/@boidcom/boid-season-2-launch-640a8b24ded.

Telos has its first NFT Marketplace in Beta to Accompany Kolobok Game
There’s a new simple asset game in town called Kolobok, collect and breed your Koloboks to create new unique collectibles. The big news is that along with the game launch, creators Cryptolions has created the first NFT marketplace for Telos called Simple Market(in Beta) to buy and sell your Koloboks. Cryptolions is a BP team based in the Ukraine that has worked on many projects including a Russian Translation Project to help popularize eosio. Check out this fun simple game, there are dozens of Koloboks on the marketplace already.

Trezor Now Available on telos.bloks.io
EOS Cafe Block announced this week the first hardware wallet for Telos through telos.bloks.io, Trezor. Users can now have TLOS on their Trezor and interact with the Telos network using Windows, Mac, Linux and Android on telos.bloks.io. Trezor is a trusted hardware wallet that allows users to store cryptocurrency safely and securely without exposing your information to any potentially compromised computers. EOS Cafe Block is a block producer on EOS with a mission to foster the mass adoption of EOSIO by creating helpful and easy-to-use tools.

https://medium.com/eos-cafe-block/trezor-is-now-available-for-eos-on-bloks-io-1670ca3be76f

TLOS now listed on Marketcap.one
Due to popular demand, TLOS has been announced as the first non-EOS Mainnet token to be listed on Marketcap.one, which can be found at marketcap.one/m/TLOS. Marketcap.one is a tool to see EOS (and now TLOS!) tokens, prices exchanges and charts. Visit their website or their Telegram channel at t.me/marketcapone for more information. We’re honored that Telos was chosen as the first token outside of EOS Mainnet to be featured on the site. View Marketcap.one’s press release on their Medium page here.

Blocktivity repairs Telos activity meter
For the past several weeks, Telos has been ranking mysteriously low on the industry-standard transaction measuring site Blocktivity.info. This week an error in transaction reporting was repaired and Telos is once again listed among the top 3 blockchain projects. Thanks to Rory Mapstone of EOSZA for helping Blocktivity correct the situation.

Telos Core Devs update and roadmap
The TCD posted an update about its previous worker proposal (TCD WP #2) being passed and paid, it’s current proposal (TCD WP #3) and the projects it is currently working on. You can read the update on our Medium page.

About the author: Douglas Horn is the Telos architect and whitepaper author, and the founder of GoodBlock, a block producer and app developer for the Telos Blockchain Network.

More about GoodBlock can be found at: www.goodblock.io

Join us on Twitter @GoodBlockio

Vote for GoodBlock on the Telos Blockchain Network @goodblocktls

Telos Core Developers — Report and Roadmap

Telos Core Developers — Report and Roadmap

July 26, 2019

The Telos Core Developers (TCD) are a group of developers, many of whom are affiliated with Telos block producers. This group works with Telos block producers and the Telos community to maintain, improve and extend the Telos blockchain network.

Worker Proposals

TCD WP #2

The Telos Core Developers Worker Proposal #2 for 535,000 TLOS was approved by Telos voters and paid out to the seven companies that had delivered work comprised by it. Due to the large amount of work done in this period, two of these payments were partial payments that will submit for final payment in TCD WP #3.

Projects delivered under TCD WP #2 include:
· Upstream code merges (GoodBlock)
· Arbitration contract eosio.arb (GoodBlock — second/final of two payments)
· Arbitration management portal (EOSphere Devs — second/final of two payments, CSX Communities)
· Chainspector site development (The Teloscope — first of two payments)
· Sqrl wallet ongoing development (Telos Miami)
· Performing snapshots (Telos Madrid, CalEOS, GoodBlock)

TCD WP #3

The current TCD worker proposal has been submitted for user voting. It requests 303,500 TLOS for work already performed and delivered over the past two months since TCD WP #2 was submitted. The recipients of funds are CalEOS, The Teloscope, and EOSphere Devs. The full worker proposal can be read on Telos IPFS: https://web.ipfs.telosfoundation.io/QmTVWy3dywQb5Xa3pCPHAPW9cxztrrAwkLkSRnVbDRbEec

Ongoing Projects

The TCD is working on a number of initiatives:

Testnet table corruption post-mortem

In the process of testing the implementation of REX and some other system upgrade functions on the testnet several weeks ago, a system contract table that tracks block producers was corrupted. Significant efforts were put in place by several block producers to correct and restart the Telos testnet. CalEOS effectively led these efforts with notable assistance by Infinitybloc and EOS USA, among others. Ultimately, the testnet was restored to normal function.

The TCD is still examining the reasons for this corrupted producers table. CalEOS continues to lead this effort and is working with GoodBlock to discover the root cause or eliminate potential causes in order to ensure that there is no risk to the Telos mainnet in performing updates to either REX or EOSIO v 1.8.

Implementing REX and the TED Plan

The Telos community is currently in the last days of voting for the Telos Economic Development Plan which is expected to vastly improve Telos economics, in part through providing a high staking reward to TLOS-holders who are engaged with the chain through voting and staking.

The TCD has been working on a plan to implement the changes that would be approved by a successful TED Plan ballot. There are two parts to this implementation: enabling REX and enabling the regular transfer of specific amounts of tokens from the exchange token reserve fund account to the five recipient accounts designated in the TED Plan. These efforts are moving forward with all due caution until the root cause of the testnet table corruption is confirmed.

The REX implementation was spearheaded by Telos Miami several weeks ago and is expected to be complete, pending confirmation of the testnet error. The funds transfer plan was proposed by GoodBlock and discussed with block producers and other TCD members. Notable contributions were added by CalEOS, which is also writing the implementation contract, which is now being tested on testnet. GoodBlock is testing the code and more TCD members are expected to audit the code before mainnet deployment.

Upgrading network to EOSIO v 1.8

Block One has released a stable build of EOSIO version 1.8.x which is a major upgrade to the EOSIO software, offering many beneficial features. The TCD intends to upgrade Telos to v 1.8 as soon as possible following the implementation of the TED Plan features. However, this still depends on first ensuring that the Telos mainnet is not at risk of table corruption first. The upgrade to v 1.8 is a forking upgrade which will create the risk of significant forks if not coordinated carefully by the Telos block producers with the help of the TCD.

Telos IPFS development

Telos has made important advancements in the Telos IPFS system necessary to many dapps. This presents a competitive advantage for Telos over all other EOSIO blockchains. GoodBlock has led the creation of Telos IPFS. This work has continued for several months. Currently, the system is active and functioning well. It supports the WPS, Ratify/Amend, and arbitration governance functions. The system is also capable of use by dapps, which will be billed by the various service providers.

Iris advanced history node development

EOS uses a private, closed-source service called dfuse to provide fast, high speed search of transaction information. Dfuse is not currently deployed on Telos. CalEOS is creating an open source version that will deploy on Telos. This should be beneficial to Dapps that need this dfuse-type service layer. Iris is essentially a websocket client that can subscribe to live data streams from the Telos blockchain. Several elements of Iris have been developed and development continues. Read more at the code repository: https://www.npmjs.com/package/@caleos/iris-client

Skunkworks project #1

GoodBlock has been leading efforts on a “secret” skunkworks project for several months. We believe that this is a novel invention in blockchain that adds real value and pro-mass adoption features to Telos. We are keeping this under wraps for now because this could be easily adopted by other chains as well (we expect it will be) and we would like to see it fully deployed on Telos first. The time when we hope to be able to reveal the project is growing closer. We think this will be a real crowd-pleaser that’ll get a lot of Likes from the community.

BP schedule optimizer

Telos Global is leading the efforts on an optimizer for the block producer scheduler. Currently, when a BP schedule is created, the rotation order is determined by the alphabetical order of the BP names. This offers a lot of room for improvement. The goal is to first create a version of the scheduler that is optimized for geolocation. This could be done either by assigning locations with numbers that roughly follow the lower-latency routes, or simply by using longitude so that the BP schedule moves smoothly around the globe. The goal is to optimize the schedule so that there are fewer times of high latency. When there is a very distant hop between BPs, there can be a lag which causes the incoming BP to miss its first block, through no real fault of its own. Optimizing by location is not perfect, but closer areas do tend to have less latency between them. Therefore, the overall amount of blocks lost to high latency situations is expected to go down. A future version can be improved with an oracle querying BP nodes for actual lag times, but that will require more development. Meanwhile, the geographic optimizer is a simple and powerful improvement.

Sqrl Mobile Project Planning

Project planning is underway by Telos Miami for Sqrl Mobile (iOS first, followed by Android) that will be a 100% Telos-focused and open source mobile wallet. Support for common wallet functions (sign up, send, receive) as well as all governance functions (BP voting, WPS, Ratify, TF voting and Arbitration) and support for EOSIO dapp signing.

About the author: Douglas Horn is the Telos architect and whitepaper author, and the founder of GoodBlock, a block producer and app developer for the Telos Blockchain Network.

More about GoodBlock can be found at: www.goodblock.io

Join us on Twitter @GoodBlockio

Vote for GoodBlock on the Telos Blockchain Network @goodblocktls